Want to Share an Automated CD Ripper?

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  S Koons 1 year, 10 months ago.

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  • #3877

    S Koons
    Participant

    I have a large number of CDs that I want to rip with something like an Acronova Nimbie NB-21DVD (about $560 new).  I’d like to share the cost with a few others.  We could pass it around every 3- 4 weeks until all of us are caught up on our ripping.  Then we could sell it.

    Let me know if you’re interested.

    Also, please post here if you have any experience with this or a similar model.  Let me know if this is a good idea (or if it is doomed).

    – Steve

  • #3940

    Pgambon
    Participant

    Does such a device exist? I did mine one at a time. 1700 CDs later…. One bit of advice if you do it one at a time , buy a stand alone Disk drive. I wrecked my iMac drive. Expensive and not fun! All history now.

  • #3945

    S Koons
    Participant

    Yes.  It’s a USB drive with a mechanism to feed a stack of up to 100 disks.  For me, the hard work will be tagging the classical CDs in a consistent way.  There’s a program called MusiCHI that is designed to help with that, but I expect to spend a few minutes for each classical CD modifying the automatic tags that the ripper pulls off the internet.

    After I’m caught up, a normal external drive should be sufficient.

    – Steve

  • #4406
    David Snyder
    David Snyder
    Keymaster

    Pretty cool idea.  There’s more info about this on the dBpoweramp website:

    https://www.dbpoweramp.com/batch-ripper.htm

    Did you ever end up going this route?

    • #4415

      S Koons
      Participant

      Yes.  I’m almost done with my CDs.  Once caught up on my digital music, I’ll probably try ripping my DVDs- far fewer, and I don’t plan a major effort to catalog the credits.  After that, I’ll put the gadget up for sale.

      – Steve

  • #4416
    David Snyder
    David Snyder
    Keymaster

    Hi Steve,

    If you have any DVD-Audio discs, DVD Audio Extractor is pretty handy.  It’s not nearly as convenient as dBpoweramp for ripping CDs since you generally have to manually enter all of the track names and embed album art and other metadata using other tools after the rip is complete.  But some DVD-Audio discs can sound pretty nice, so it’s worth the effort (and easier than “ripping” vinyl)!

    The challenge with ripping DVD movies for me was working out which format to use since there are so many to choose from!  Ripping to ISO images is safest way to go since you can easily create other formats from the ISO files if you find something else that works better with your media player.  My favorite software is from Slysoft; if all you’re doing is ripping to ISO files, AnyDVD is all that you need.  CloneDVD is a nice add-on if you want to save space by including only the main feature in the ISO files instead of all of the previews and extras.

    DVDFab is what I found works well to create MKV and other file formats from the ISO files.  I usually use “MKV Passthrough”.  Essentially, Matroska (MKV) format is the video equivalent container to FLAC–based on open standards with no patents or licenses. Passthrough means that there’s no re-encoding of the video or audio bits..they are just included as-is for no loss in quality.  I’ve had some older discs that exhibit audio/video sync issues when converting to MKV, which is why I say to stick with ISO for your initial rips and then experiment with MKV and other formats later.

    Hope some of these tips will save you (and others) some of the time that I lost when working through a similar project myself.  I also welcome anyone else in SFAS to chime in on this thread with techniques that have worked for them.

    • #4417

      S Koons
      Participant

      DVD-Audio isn’t an issue for me, though I’d like to find a practical way to rip SACDs (I’m not sure I want to go down the antique PS3 route, that’s the only thing I’ve found instructions for online).

      For DVD-Video, only a few programs integrate with the automated feeder in the Nimbie.  PC: QQBox Pro 3, ImgBurn or MyMovies.  Mac: Ripit.  Of course, any software will work with the saved files after ripping.

      – Steve

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