QoBuz by David Hicks

Sep 28, 2018

High-resolution audio is generally defined as music files that have a higher sampling frequency and/or bit depth than that of Compact Disc Digital Audio, which is specified at 16 bit/44.1 kHz.   

Copper Weights for Headshells, by Joe Hakim

Sep 20, 2018

If you are into vinyl playback, it’s likely you will eventually run into the need for a headshell weight to improve the low frequency resonance point of your tonearm/cartridge combination.

Sound from Sight

Apr 05, 2013

The recordings are analog, but the medium is ink on paper.

This article describes the process used by Indiana University,

Is DSD more accurate than hires PCM?

Mar 20, 2013

Not really, especially 24bit/192kHz PCM.

It’s a shame that good articles like this 11-year-old piece have fallen into the Wayback-machine crypt.

Don’t Understand Digital Audio? Xiph Can Help!

Feb 26, 2013

This video contains the most lucid instruction on digital audio theory that I have seen.

The exposition should benefit non-technical folks as much or more than techies,

Can High-resolution Digital Cause Distortion? Yes!

Dec 19, 2012

This past March, I wrote about a controversial article posted to the Xiph.org web site. Take a moment to scan that article.

Circuitlab.com – A Boon to DIY Audio Everywhere

Mar 14, 2012

I’ve spent the last few evenings running through some circuit analysis using new web-based modeling software on Circuitlab.

So far,

Are High-resolution Music Downloads “Senseless”?

Mar 05, 2012

Ensconced in my office at Untangle this afternoon, I was doing my daily regimen of high-tech reading when….I see an article on “24/192 downloads”appear on my favorite techie news service –

Null Testing and Listening Testing of “Mastered for iTunes”

Feb 26, 2012

In this video, Ian Shepard of Production Advice in the UK compares a CD track to both its “raw” AAC coded form and a “Mastered for iTunes”

Audio Primer: How the Pros Use EQ and Compression

Feb 26, 2012

Audiophiles are taught that equalization (EQ) and compression are BAD. However, used judiciously, they are useful or even GOOD.

Joe Gilder’s “